A little about what keeps me going besides coffee, naps, and my cats…

I’m a filmmaker and writer who loves imaginative compelling stories that take lots of risks. I myself lean towards magical realism and quirky characters, and typically set my stories in the south of the US. Although I was born in Texas, I’ve lived in Colorado, New York City, New Orleans, Spain, and currently call Austin, Texas home, but not forever.

I used to be an electronic musician a while back, writing under the names of “Neutral” and “Squab Teen.” I worked in the collective “Chromosome 57” in New Orleans in the late 90s, and was a studio runner for Nine Inch Nails while they recorded “The Fragile” in New Orleans. I have much of my own material released on Ant Zen/Hymen in Germany, and Planet-Mu, and have done remix work for various artists.

While I still dream of getting back into music, I think my true callings were always deeper. I have always been a story-teller, and even while a musician, I found myself sitting before the screens of old Mac computers, typing out stories and ideas for films I wanted to make.

Fast forward a bit in time.

There are fewer things I love than writing at night with a glass of wine, and my cats, Olive and Lucy, hanging out with me. Some of my favorite writers are Neil Gaiman, Helene Wecker, Haruki Murakami, Margaret Atwood, David Sedaris, Tom Robbins, and Chuck Palahniuk, but this list is always changing and growing. For film, I love the work of Ingmar Bergman, Peter Greenaway, Alex Cox, David Lynch, and my favorite film of all time will always be the original Blade Runner.

You probably noticed how I did not list any women in my list of filmmakers.  I think while things are slowly changing, few chances have arisen for women directors to become auteurs in their own right in this medium. It takes a long career to develop a voice in film, a shit ton of support and talented crew to help develop a body of work and mature voice. Women just haven’t historically received the support they would need to become auteurs like Lynch or Hitchcock. Film still has a long way to go taking the creative risks that prose does, and an even longer way to go at being more representative of this bizarre world in which we live, and all of the diverse types of people that reside on this planet, including women.